Hollow Feathers
transylvanialand:

Kirkjufell by CoolbieRe on Flickr.
lileks:

DAD YOU SAID CLOWN WEEK WAS OVER 

lileks:

DAD YOU SAID CLOWN WEEK WAS OVER 

brudesworld:

The Ghost of Ghoul Swamp, 1953

brudesworld:

The Ghost of Ghoul Swamp, 1953

qinni:

Don’t leave your house at night, when the jellyfishes comes out…

Done in photoshop and SAI

Wallpaper version | 

angrynerdyblogger:

one of my favourite things to imagine is a teenage tom riddle making up his new intimidating nickname. just sitting at his desk and carefully printing “TOM MARVOLO RIDDLE” on the parchment. writing down “I AM LORD” and looking at the remaining letters. TOMVORDLE. no that’s no good. TORDOVLEM. absolutely not. VOLDEMORT. yes. good. this is gonna make a dramatic reveal one day. hell yeah.


Le Sphinx Mystérieux, Charles van der Stappen, 1897

Le Sphinx Mystérieux, Charles van der Stappen, 1897


Boris Karloff on set of The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Boris Karloff on set of The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Hellboy & Abe Sapien by Tonci Zonjic

ddaniell:

A Japanese warplane Second World War lies wrecked in shallow water off Guam in a photograph which won Tony Cherbas second in the Topside category. (via)

ddaniell:

A Japanese warplane Second World War lies wrecked in shallow water off Guam in a photograph which won Tony Cherbas second in the Topside category. (via)

death-psychedelic:

Wayne Barlowe’s Hell-themed artwork

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.